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  • Base Camp: How To Camp In The Base Camp: How To Camp In The Snow

    • From: ryandunfee121157
    • Description:

      Base Camp is a semi-frequent photo column where we check out the cabins, lean-tos, igloos, tents, and RVs where mountain-minded folk base their adventures out of. To kick off our series, we profiled friends James Roh and Joey Howell, who quit their jobs to spend the winter hunting for pow while living out of their truckbed-mounted camper. This week we profile Snowtrekker Tents, a Wisconsin company that makes canvas tents for winter camping that are for Arctic dogsledding, weekend ski missions, and even TGR's own Fantasy Camp in the remote Neocola mountain range of Alaska.

      snowtrekker-cover-photo.jpg

      When it comes to winter camping, few outfits have the bonafides of Wisconsin’s Snowtrekker Tents. Compared to your average ubertech badass orange dome tent walled of balloon-tight synthetic fibers, the Snowtrekker’s stitched canvas walls and antiquated appearance, with the tin chimney of a wood stove sticking out the side, seem dated. But they are no joke. A favorite among dogsledders who run overnight races in the far reaches of Northern Canada and who love the tents for being rugged, lightweight, exceedingly comfortable no matter the temp, and very easy to set up in under five minutes.

      It was the rugged reputation of the Snowtrekker tents that persuaded TGR to employ them for housing for last year’s Fantasy Camp, a heli-skiing expedition that sought to film athletes like Ian MacIntosh, Sage Cattabriga-Alosa, and Angel Collinson in the remote and untapped Neacola Mountains. The expedition required setting up a self-sustaining base camp on a frozen lake 20 miles from anything considered civilization for several weeks. If that challenge wasn’t enough, the lack of available firewood in the area meant that instead of the hot and efficient wood stoves traditionally used to heat the Snowtrekkers, small kerosene heaters had to be used instead. To stave off the Alaskan cold, Snowtrekker put two layers of canvas on the roofs, while TGR’s logistics partner, Alaska Alpine Adventrues, pre-fabricated sections of flooring built out of wood frames, foam insulation, and stray insulation. Snowtrekker even customized one of their tents to be a sauna and shower for the crew during their stay. 

      The entire base camp, along with cases and cases of beer and plenty of firearms for down-day entertainment, was flown in a Caravan 208 prop plane to the remote village of Nikski, Alaska, and from there each load was split in two and flown in a smaller Beaver turboprop with skis by famed Alaskan bush pilot Doug Brewer twenty miles to Fantasy Camp. “We had never done that before,” said TGR Lead Guide Kent Scheller, reflecting on the task of finding, and establishing, and maintaining an off-the-grid base camp for a top-level film crew. “The logistics were almost unmanageable.”

      Of course, pro skiers aren’t the only people making use of Snowtrekker’s tents. The couple that owns it, Duane and Margot Lottig, take it with them on their weekend trips up to ski Mt. Bohemia, the Upper Peninsula’s secret powder skier’s paradise. “With camping fees and the cost of firewood coming out at $27 a day, it’s lot more economical than staying in a motel for $75-150 a night.” Not to mention all the creature comforts of home afforded in their Snowtrekker tents, from the ambience of an antique wood stove to warm, dry gear in the morning and plenty of insulation from the Midwest cold.

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      The weekend starts with the Lottigs packing the trailer with the tent and all their supplies for the weekend. With experience, the Lottig's learned to modify their camp supplies and furniture to lay flat in the bed of the trailer.

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       After finding a camp spot, they lay down an weather rug that allows free water to flow away from underneath the tent. A waterproof tarp is then laid down to keep the floor of the tent dry.

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      All set up and ready to go. The Lottigs use the EXP Basecamp model on their "glamping" trips, like this one to Mt. Bohemia, but utilize lighterweight versions if they're hiking it in themselves.

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      "We designed and manufactured waterproof duffels specifically to fit under the bed. Our full sized double bed is as comfortable room as anything from a 5 star motel.  It’s often hard to force yourself to get up in the morning!"

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      Tech be damned, the Lottigs prefer a cast-iron woodstove for both hear and cooking during their winter camping outings, fueled by a mix of firewood and sawdust bricks. "Some people prepare fairly elaborate meals; we tend to do one pot meals- heart soups that you can eat with a fork. With a wood stove, we can keep the temperature in the tent at 70 degrees, even when the temps outside are below zero."

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      "The temperature in the ridge, which peaks out at nearly eight feet tall, stays in the 90’s, and we hang all of our gear there to dry. Every day we start out with thoroughly dry gear." Ah, the good things in life...

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      The Lottigs most recently used their namesake tents to hit up their favorite MidWest powder stash, Mt. Bohemia in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. "Mt. Bohemia is an ancient volcano with about 900 vertical feet. It's got about 500 acres of mostly tight tree skiing. There is no snow making, no grooming, and no beginners allowed. Year to date snowfall this season is sitting right around 335", thanks in part to being surrounded by Lake Superior on two sides. Here a local tele skier tastes the goods for the lens of Joey Wallis.

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      "There are two lifts at Bohemia, but because of the shape of the mountain, you can pretty much ski off the top in all directions.  It's possible to pop out of the woods nearly a mile from the base of the lift, so the mountain runs a shuttle bus up and down the road at the base of the mountain. You simply stand by the edge of the road wherever you come out of the woods and the bus stops and picks you up.  The spirit, enthusiasm and energy that you get from the riders on the bus reminds us of the same feeling we got riding the tram at Jackson Hole."

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      Duane and Margot at their favorite hill. "If we get seperated skiing, I just ask the liftie if they've seen anybody that looks like me, but smaller," said Duane.

      Want more Base Camp? Check out:
      -Base Camp: The Powder Pilgrimage Rig
      -Base Camp: The Riverfront Tahoe Cabin
      -Base Camp: Dream VT Ski Cabin

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  • Last Call: Slomo Bladin', Jere Last Call: Slomo Bladin', Jeremy Jones Bikes, Dreamy Euro Pow

    • From: TetonGravityResearch
    • Description:

      Welcome to Last Call. Dropping every Friday, this column serves as a wrap-up of our favorite stories and videos from the week—some old, some new, but all worthy of attention.

      The Story of Slomo The Pacific Beach Blader

      The New York Times made a sweet short documentary about Dr. John Kitchin aka "Slomo," who was inspired to leave his job as a wealty doctor to "fly" to the rhythm of music while cruising on rollerblades down the Pacific Beach boardwalk in San Diego. The inspiration? Sitting in line for lunch behind a 90-year old man who had piled enough food on his plate for a college football player. When asked how he could eat so much for "such a healthy young man," the elderly gentleman's response was simple and powerful: "Do what you want."

      Jackson Hole Gaper Day Big Air

      If you didn't catch Social Media Editor Joni McGregor's photo recap earlier today from this week's Gaper Day at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, this video from professional filmer Jake Strassman, set to the legendary '90s jam "Free Falling," pretty much captures it.

      Dreamy Euro POV Pow from The Mags 

      One of our TGR forum members from Europe, sqikunst, made this heartening video of him and a buddy skiing some slow-motion low-angle untracked pow on the slopes of Stubai, Austria. It's nothing that's going to win any awards for gnarly action, but the product of skiing powder in slow motion with some smooth camera work only inches away is as close to art as sliding on two goofy sticks will ever be.

      Jeremy Jones Shreds A Mountain Bike! 

      ...well, not the Jeremy Jones you know and love (Big Mountain Jeremy Jones). This is actually Jibber Jeremy Jones blasting his local trails around Salt Lake City last fall, and for a guy that mostly does crazy pop shuv-its down stairsets on a snowboard, he sure knows how to throw around a 29'er!

      We Don't Always Post Park Edit, But When We Do...

      ...they usually involve double backflips gapping over halfpipes. Sweden's Jasper Tjader went for it over the biggest gap the insane course at the annual Nine Knights contest offered, which measured out at a clean 180 feet, with likely the same distance to the ground if you came up short.

      You're Not Where You Think You Should Be

      Hong Kong. You know, that place where they filmed the Rush Hour movies. Damn Chris Tucker is a funny ass dude! "Fifty million dollars? Man, who do you think you kidnapped? Chelsea Clinton?" At any rate, it's probably not high on your list as far as mountain biking destinations go. But as this artful video from the gang at Bike Magazine shows, it just might should be.

      Want more Last Call video action? Check out:
      -Last Call March 28th: VT Backcountry, Urban Downhilling in Mexico, Pow Wow Recap
      -Last Call March 21st: Blacking Out, Climate Change, and Surfing Saunas
      -Last Call March 14th: Tuckerman Ravine, the Art of the Carve, and Japanimation

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  • Last Call: Slomo Bladin', Jere Last Call: Slomo Bladin', Jeremy Jones Bikes, Dreamy Euro Pow

    • From: ryandunfee121157
    • Description:

      Welcome to Last Call. Dropping every Friday, this column serves as a wrap-up of our favorite stories and videos from the week—some old, some new, but all worthy of attention.

      The Story of Slomo The Pacific Beach Blader

      The New York Times made a sweet short documentary about Dr. John Kitchin aka "Slomo," who was inspired to leave his job as a wealty doctor to "fly" to the rhythm of music while cruising on rollerblades down the Pacific Beach boardwalk in San Diego. The inspiration? Sitting in line for lunch behind a 90-year old man who had piled enough food on his plate for a college football player. When asked how he could eat so much for "such a healthy young man," the elderly gentleman's response was simple and powerful: "Do what you want."

      Jackson Hole Gaper Day Big Air

      If you didn't catch Social Media Editor Joni McGregor's photo recap earlier today from this week's Gaper Day at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, this video from professional filmer Jake Strassman, set to the legendary '90s jam "Free Falling," pretty much captures it.

      Dreamy Euro POV Pow from The Mags 

      One of our TGR forum members from Europe, sqikunst, made this heartening video of him and a buddy skiing some slow-motion low-angle untracked pow on the slopes of Stubai, Austria. It's nothing that's going to win any awards for gnarly action, but the product of skiing powder in slow motion with some smooth camera work only inches away is as close to art as sliding on two goofy sticks will ever be.

      Jeremy Jones Shreds A Mountain Bike! 

      ...well, not the Jeremy Jones you know and love (Big Mountain Jeremy Jones). This is actually Jibber Jeremy Jones blasting his local trails around Salt Lake City last fall, and for a guy that mostly does crazy pop shuv-its down stairsets on a snowboard, he sure knows how to throw around a 29'er!

      We Don't Always Post Park Edit, But When We Do...

      ...they usually involve double backflips gapping over halfpipes. Sweden's Jasper Tjader went for it over the biggest gap the insane course at the annual Nine Knights contest offered, which measured out at a clean 180 feet, with likely the same distance to the ground if you came up short.

      You're Not Where You Think You Should Be

      Hong Kong. You know, that place where they filmed the Rush Hour movies. Damn Chris Tucker is a funny ass dude! "Fifty million dollars? Man, who do you think you kidnapped? Chelsea Clinton?" At any rate, it's probably not high on your list as far as mountain biking destinations go. But as this artful video from the gang at Bike Magazine shows, it just might should be.

      Want more Last Call video action? Check out:
      -Last Call March 28th: VT Backcountry, Urban Downhilling in Mexico, Pow Wow Recap
      -Last Call March 21st: Blacking Out, Climate Change, and Surfing Saunas
      -Last Call March 14th: Tuckerman Ravine, the Art of the Carve, and Japanimation

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  • Last Call: VT Backcountry, Urb Last Call: VT Backcountry, Urban Downhilling, Pow Wow Recap!

    • From: ryandunfee121157
    • Description:

      Welcome to Last Call. Dropping every Friday, this column serves as a wrap-up of our favorite stories and videos from the week—some old, some new, but all worthy of attention.

      Working For The Weekend: Vermont Backcountry

      We've posted every one of these East Coast edits produced by Ski The East starring Portland, Maine lawyer Ben Leoni - a long-standing Meathead Films star who is currently doing his best to reconcile life as a full-time lawyer and his passion for skiing. In this episode, Leoni & others explore the woods of northern Vermont, which, uncharacteristically for New England, are open enough to link legit turns and are blessed with snow totals similar to the those in Colorado (really!), and sometimes even more (the 2007/2008 season brought 423" to Jay Peak). Still to date, some of my best days on snow have come in tight hardwood lines like these ones, where narrow little slots get loaded with way more than the storm total making for tunnel-vision faceshots. 

      We look forward to the crew hitting up another uncharacteristically awesome New England zone - Mt. Washington and the surrounding high alpine terrain. Bring it on!

      Brothers in the Backcountry

      Kevin and Mitchell Brower are Salt Lake-based brothers who have been at it in the Wasatch for a long long time - if you remember Kris Ostness' short film for Atomic, 44 Days, you'll remember their skiing. Well, they're still at it in this year's The Brothers Brower series, and followed up their seriously awesome urban edit with an all-backcountry version. In between managing their own kids and running Salt Lake's own ski & snowboard training facility, Snogression, Kevin and Mitchell grab the sleds and throw down in the Wasatch backcountry, adding a bunch of massive tricks and one rediculous cliff wallride into their bag of accomplishments this winter.

      'Tis The Season... For Summer Winter!

      It's about that time of year when us skiers and snowboarders start considering one of two outlandish expenses: a new drift boat/mountain bike/climbing setup/whitewater raft, or a trip down South somewhere to keep the winter going all summer long. SASS Global Travel, a backcountry ski and snowboard camp placed in Bariloche, Argentina, caters to that second group with the promise of deep pow in August and every kind of conceivable terrain to shred while cold snow slaps you in the face. What's your plan? 

      Urban Downhilling in Mexico

      The phenomenon of urban downhill races in Central and South America is wild as hell. Free from the constraints of American-style litigation, course organizers are free to build race courses through sinewy alleys and down city streets in places like Taxco, Mexico. Instead of rock gardens, berms and tabletops, the obstacles instead include dozens of stairsets, hairpin turns in people's back gardens, and gnarly wooden jumps up and over brick walls and through town squares. Slovakian rider Filip Polc has the sack for it, but the office crew here at TGR? We'd rather fall on dirt (and from a much lower height)...

      Jackson Hole Pow-Wow Recap

      The Pow-Wow, which Managing Editor Mike Sudmeier did a nice written recap of the other week, is a chance for many people involved in the snowboard industry to get together, test funky new boards, and celebrate the lineage of snowboarding with OGs like Jeff Grell and Steve Link, and the most soulful snowboard maker in all of the world of Keeping It Real, Gentemstick's Taro Tamai. Here's a nice little recap from the event.

      One of the board sets being given in a run around JHMR was that of local guide Mikey Franco, who's established his own brand of boards with Franco Snowshapes, who's been designing beautiful handmade snowboards right here in Jackson Hole at the Igneus factory. Ever wanted to build your own board? Here's a little visual insight into the process.

      Want more Last Call? Check out:
      -Last Call March 21st: Blacking out, climate change, and surfing saunas
      -Last Call March 14th: Tuckerman Ravine, the art of the carve, and Japanimation
      -Last Call March 7th: Local's Edition exposes boozing on the slopes, Travis Rice returns, and Fernie pow from the air

       

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  • Photo Gallery: Reliving Winter Photo Gallery: Reliving Winter Storm Vulcan

    • From: ryandunfee121157
    • Description:

      Winter storms in the East have been getting named like hurricanes for a few years now, but few times has it made more sense than last week. While it wasn't Winter Storm Ullr, Winter Storm Vulcan had an appropriately badass enough name for the kind of fury it delivered, dropping upwards of two feet off an extremely generous swath of the Northeast, from Whiteface in New York to Vermont's Green Mountains all the way to Maine. We look back on some of the best days of the East's 2014 season...

      WHITEFACE, NEW YORK

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      Even the Empire State got in on this one. Last Thursday after 21 inches blessed New York's highest ski area, local Justin Perry got the Jay-Z bumpin' in time to hammer this textbook slash for the lens of Louie Armstong (no relation to the deceased trumpeter).

      KILLINGTON, VERMONT

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      A Beast local finds enough space for a graceful pop turn in the woods of Killington after upwards of two feet hammered the mountain last week.

      SUGARLOAF, MAINE

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      While skis with a 120+ waist might seem a bit out of place most of the year, last week the fatties were right at home among the goods of Vulcan. Here Sugarloaf local "Milky" plants one deep and sees if he can find the bottom.

      STOWE, VERMONT

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      By the 14th, Stowe had received nearly two feet. But secondary tremors all the way through the weekend brought three inches here, six inches there, and eight here, providing the makings for some serious free refills.

      JAY PEAK, VERMONT

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      For those more inclined to sideways sliding, Vulcan provided the perfect canvas to surf the Earth (of New England). Here Jay local Chuck doesn't even need a slash to make you salivate over the two feet that hit the Northeast Kingdom last week.

      SADDLEBACK, MAINE

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      East Coast photographer Ryan Denning took a chance and ventured into unknown territory, making the four-hour drive north to Saddleback, one of Maine's least talked about hills. The bet paid off; the Casablanca glades were choked with two feet of Maine cold smoke and guys like Rob Brown, above, only had to contend with two dozen others when they weren't coming up for air in the trees.

      WILDCAT, NEW HAMPSHIRE

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      You know it's a good week in the East when those coming up on the lighter end of the dawn conditions report are still calling 18 inches. Here Pat Walsh charges through one of Wildcat's signature tight tree shots, seeing no cause to hunt for pow anywhere "deeper."

      VERMONT BACKCOUNTRY

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      TGR's forum users (the "maggots") sure as hell made sure their sick days were stacked up in time for March's signature storms. Here Sequoiashan raises hell in the woods near Mad River Glen for the lens of Thin Cover. 

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  • thin cover vt bc march 14.jpg thin cover vt bc march 14.jpg

    • From: ryandunfee121157
    • Description:

      Reliving Winter Storm Vulcan through photos from the East Coast's prize March powder dump.

    • 4 weeks ago
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  • Base Camp: Tahoe Cabin Base Camp: Tahoe Cabin

    • From: TetonGravityResearch
    • Description:

      By Tess Weaver

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      Photo by Ben Meester

      Base Camp is a new semi-frequent photo column where we check out the cabins, lean-tos, igloos, tents, and RVs where mountain-minded folk base their adventures out of. To kick off our series, we profiled friends James Roh and Joey Howell, who quit their jobs to spend the winter hunting for pow while living out of their truckbed-mounted camper. This week we profile Emily Turner, the Director of Operations for Alpenglow Adventures, and Jesse Bushey, a blacksmith, and their quiant Tahoe Cabin - Bear Rock. 

      Halfway between Squaw Valley and Tahoe City, Emily Turner and Jesse Bushey park on Highway 89, cross the Truckee River on a narrow (and slippery when cold) footbridge, and walk up a trail to their cabin in the woods. Built in 1912 with wood milled in Truckee, the rustic abode named “Bear Rock” is only 420 square feet, but Bushey and Turner have maximized the space in a unique manner.  For instance, a custom built bed hangs from the ceiling in a corner of the living room. A long narrow bar and bench take up very little space under a window, but when pulled from the wall can seat almost a dozen dinner guests. To access the basement in winter, when the access door is buried in snow, they cut a trapdoor under the couch in the living room. The ultimate space saver (and mess diffuser) might be the detached bathroom and "dressing room" fifty feet from the cabin. The couple lined a space attached to the bathroom with dressers on one side and hooks on the other to keep clothes, laundry and gear out of the main house. “It's sometimes cold and annoying to have to go out there, but it gets you outside and it keeps our house tidy,” says Turner. 

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      For years, the property sat vacant, with a for sale sign luring a few curious buyers each year. When Turner asked a realtor friend about the cabin, he said it had insurmountable problems. But a year later, Turner and Bushey called the selling agent to see the house. 

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      “He spent a solid 30 minutes on the phone with us, discouraging us from even going to look,” says Turner. “After he told us every problem the place had, he asked if we still wanted to see it. We said, ‘Yes. It sounds perfect.’”

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      The couple’s initial offer was denied and out of the blue, another buyer stepped in with an offer. Turner and Bushey were devastated and Turner wrote an emotional letter to the owner conveying their already deep seeded love for the property. But it was too late, he'd accepted the other offer. 

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      Their only hope was that the buyer would disappear—like, literally, vanish. And he did. He paid his deposit and then never followed through with the other formalities. In January of 2013, the cabin was theirs.

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      Bushey and Turner have spent the last year cleaning, painting, refinishing floors and turning the cabin into their own piece of paradise. As a blacksmith, Bushey has built certain things that would otherwise be difficult or extremely expensive to come by. “Blacksmiths tend to have a penchant for things that last and that's how this profession and passion of his really affects our home,” says Turner. “When steel is an option, he doesn't make due with plastic, so things work well, feel solid, and look good.”

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      According to Turner, the house leans in one direction, but she says it’s not falling over anytime soon. At first, cleanliness was the biggest issue. The couple deep cleaned for two weeks. “Lots and lots of mouse poop,” says Turner. The walls were covered in really rough plywood and portions were covered in burlap glued on in the 60s.

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      They kept a few furnishings that have been in place for decades: the wood stove, the cook stove, the old-school sink, the Model T wheel that hangs above the hearth… the story goes that a drunk carpenter crashed it in the river when building the house. 

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      “I love that everything is a bit of a process, from getting changed in the detached bathroom/dressing room to bringing in groceries from the car. I love the cold river air and morning mist, the privacy, being able to swim the moment I get too hot. I love our sole cedar tree amid a forest of pines and firs, the wildlife—though I don't love the mountain lion that Jesse recently saw). I love that I need to remember my headlamp if I'm going to be returning after dark, but I also love when I forget it and the moon is bright.  I love the old trails that no one knows about. I love that it kind of feels like camp, albeit a camp for learning how to carry heavy things. I even like the sound of the hundreds upon hundreds of people who drunkenly raft the Truckee everyday during the summer—it's really just the sound of people having fun.”

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      Want more Base Camp? Check out:
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  • Base Camp: Dream VT Ski Cabin Base Camp: Dream VT Ski Cabin Becomes Reality

    • From: ryandunfee121157
    • Description:

      Base Camp is a new semi-frequent photo column where we check out the cabins, lean-tos, igloos, tents, and RVs where mountain-minded folk base their adventures out of. To kick off our series, we profiled friends James Roh and Joey Howell, who quit their jobs to spend the winter hunting for pow while living out of their truckbed-mounted camper. This week we profile Jeff Young, who converted a dilapidated Vermont shack into a choice ski cabin that would host hundreds of TGR community members over the years.

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      Jeff Young, known as BigDaddy in the TGR Forums, had been visiting Vermont’s Mad River Valley, home to the infamous ski areas of Sugarbush and Mad River Glen, since the early 1970s, but it wasn’t until 2005 that Young, a die-hard skier, would get a chance to make his dream of a Vermont ski cabin a reality. An employee of his owned a dilapidated cabin on ten acres a few miles from his wife’s friend’s house, and was looking to sell the place as he was going through a difficult divorce and bankruptcy.

      A dreamer of an architect and contractor, Jeff could see the undervalued cabin had serious potential. He waited two years until his employee exited bankruptcy, another several months for an illegal squatter to vacate the place, and put in years of sweat and labor to see through his vision of the perfect base camp for adventures in the Green Mountain, which included hosting the annual Ullrfest – a reunion of snow-starved TGR forum members in the waning days of fall – for several years. This is his story.

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      “The house was owned by an employee of mine who had gone thru a divorce and bankruptcy. He had a renter who stopped paying him rent after only a couple months, taking advantage of his problems and so he lived for two and half years rent-free.  My employee sold it to me, though I waited two years for him to get out of bankruptcy so he would be sure to get all the money.  It was well worth it.  

      He was officially evicted and given legal notification a month before I took ownership.  He made no effort to move, but we communicated via notes tacked to his door.  I had a dumpster delivered to the driveway and gave him two more weeks to move before I put everything in it.  After one week, I offered him $200 if he was able to clear his stuff out in the remaining time.  Mid-week he came home and pulled into the driveway, but nearly ran into the back-ho my friend was driving.  Being hunting season, my friend had his shotgun on his lap, but the squatter took this to be meant for him.  He then jumped out of his car and began crying, ‘I promise to move my stuff out... please don't hurt me!’  I didn't bother to tell him, the gun was intended for deer.”

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      Despite Jeff’s wife being dead-set against the project, he began a years-long process of converting the small cabin into the Vermont skiing base camp he’d been dreaming about for thirty years. He spent the first year gutting the cabin and adding a mudroom while cleaning out the years of garbage and twenty-five abandoned old cars that were strewn about the property.

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      He turned the entire downstairs into a single space, added windows and reworked the stairs, and turned the upstairs loft into two bedrooms while adding a bathroom.

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      Jeff did all the design, carpentry, wiring, and finish work himself, turning the decrepit home into a stellar cabin that sleeps six comfortably and offers a killer patio with a hot tub out back.

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      But Jeff (above right, with Rob MacCormick aka Stayalert on the left) wasn't just going to enjoy the place by himself, and ended up hosting dozens of TGR forum members ("maggots") every fall before the snow fell. "Ullrfest is party for maggots/skiers begun by Snowsprite (Terri Isidro) and Earlywood (Fran Gray) in 2006.  I began hosting in 2008 and continued for five years to 2012.  Every fall, maggots from New England and as far as Alaska and Canada gather to celebrate the start of a new ski season and reconnect over beers, bonfires, and ski films like Under The Influence and The Dream Factory.

      Ullrfest-2012.jpg

      "When I volunteered to provide space for the event, I decided to try and make it something special, so I roasted a pig and made a drop cloth movie screen to show ski movies outdoors.  It was incredibly cold, but we had a bonfire and at least thirty people attended.  Each year it grew a little more, and by 2012, over a hundred people were attending and I had built a permanent movie screen, a stage for bands, an outhouse, and had cleared a dozen tent sites and put up solar-powered lights so people could find their way around the woods. One year we even coordinated delivery of ten pounds of home-cooked bacon from Washington, D.C. through a mag-to-mag handoff through the Providence airport and an office in Massachusetts.”

      VT-Freeheel-on-left-DoWork-on-right-Jim-with-shot.jpg

      Forum member VT-Freeheel looks on while Dowork pours the medicine for a willing Ullrfest patient.

      "It seemed to pour every year, but the hearty crew was never phased.  The year of Hurricane Irene, we raised $2500 for flood relief and yes, it rained again. Hosting Ullrfest was probably the most fun we ever had at the ski cabin, and many adventures and meet-ups were formulated during the evenings. It’s helped created stronger bonds in the TGR forums, with people now knowing the faces and names behind many of the aliases, and we’ve had some incredible days on the hill together in all kinds of conditions, sharing our passion for snow. I feel I have been rewarded ten-fold just for opening my doors a few weekends a year!”

      jeff-young-skiing-MRG.jpg

      BigDaddy - or Jeff Young as his architecture clients know him - linking his VT-bred Worth Skis through his favorite stash at Mad River Glen.

      And his skeptical wife? “It was very difficult working with her so dead-set against it, but she has completely come around. It’s become her favorite place to be and she absolutely loves it.”

      The cabin itself is also available for rent, provided the snow isn't too good in Vermont that particular weekend...

       Never dropped into the TGR Forums? Check 'em out here. Want more Base Camp? Check Out:
      -The Powder Pilgrimmage Rig

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    • 1 month ago
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  • N. VT BC avalanche N. VT BC avalanche

    • From: jw1080
    • Description:

      After over 2 ft fell on N. VT, the persistent weak ice layer spawned multiple avies.  Got some real good footage from a seldom shot angle on a decent sized slide -- big for VT. 

    • 2 months ago
    • Views: 235
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  • Forum Watch: January 24th, 201 Forum Watch: January 24th, 2014

    • From: ryandunfee121157
    • Description:

      Forum Watch is a new column where we here at the front page of TGR's website make an effort to capture some of the grassroots awesomeness, completely unfiltered conversations being had, and connections being made in our very own TGR forums. This week we cover the recovery of a maggot's (TGR member = maggot) burnt-down home, gripped moments, Tahoe refugees, and epic trip report.

      Maggot Down: Lightning just struck our man twice. WTF!!!

      dalton-harben-fire-tgr-forums.jpg

      Top of the news is a tragic bit: forum member Dalton Harben aka Thin Cover's home in Cambridge, Vermont burned to the ground on Tuesday night, possibly due to a faulty ATV battery charger. The fire broke out late in the night, requiring Dalton to rush his wife, five-year-old son and six-month-old daughter into the cold night to safety before the entire house became consumed. Apparently Dalton's wife was sent to the hospital and the entire demo fleet for Worth Skis, of which Dalton was a co-founder, was destroyed in the fire, along with his car. 

      But the selfless mags responded quickly after Dalton's business partner and friend, sending cash payments to Dalton's family (you can PayPal money to redline3108@yahoo.com if you're interested in helping) and organizing shipments of clothing and equipment and offerings of errands of all kinds.

      Dalton was overwhelemed with the response:

      "Hey Guys, 

      As usual the response from the TGR family has been tremendously overwhelming. You guys are all amazing. We bounced around last 2 days, but should have a solid place to stay for a while, starting today, until we get things sorted out. Here is the address I will be at:

      168 Woodlands Lane, Hyde Park VT 05655. If sending USPS then PO box 42 Cambridge, VT 05444, ATTN: Dalton Harben. 

      Rough times for sure, but you guys are providing much needed positive energy and strength. I will try to update when I get connected again. 

      Thanks again all, you guys are way too awesome."

      A big thanks is owed to the maggots (our forum users) who have or are currently helping out Dalton and his family. Sounds like it'd be a good time to pre-order a pair of Worths as well...

      Holy Shit it Snowed in Mammoth 13/14 Haps

      i-Hd3JQnt-L.jpg

      The Tahoe and Mammoth regional threads in the forums have been awfully quiet this winter; something to do with the intensely miserable drought they've been suffering this winter that has left the snowpack at somewhere between ten and twenty percent of normal. There was even another thread starting under the title of Incoming Refugees from Tahoe DroughtThanks to the foot of snow that just laid an as-yet-unseen blanket of white across the Sierras, the positivity is starting to show, but before that, member Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer  posted this pick of a bare Yosemite National Park:

      "Wow - I can't get over how little snow is in the High Sierra right now. Shot from this weekend looking out towards Conness, Ragged Peak, etc.. past Tuolumne. Nothing. On the plus side, the climbing right now is pretty incredible for January. Enginerd and I had the top of Half Dome to ourselves in the middle of the day on a Sunday. Pretty cool."

      tahoe-to-utalorado - a road trip tr

      photoi.jpg

      Powdork was one of those Tahoe refugees making the pilgrimmage to the Intermountain West to find that soft, loose snow we call powder. On the voyage through Colorado, Vail Pass provided some much-needed sustenance, which he documented for the trip report.

      utalorado-297.jpg

      Member tahoetrash tries not to salivate at the taste of fresh pow with a foreign-ly light moisture content off Vail Pass.

      utalorado-420.jpg

      Of course, multi-season adventures in a single trip are all the rage these days, so the crew made sure to stop by the Fisher Towers area of eastern Utah for some rock climbing. Here hutchski proves she hasn't let her skiing screw up her hip flexors.

      Knuckledraggers Sue Alta

      The skier vs. snowboarder argument took off again when a Salt Lake City group sued Alta and the Forest Service in order to force them to get over being one of the final three ski-only holdouts and allow snowboarding. Responses varied from calling out the frivolity of a lawsuit allowing "equal access" for a fringe winter sport to tired sighs over this age-old battle to wondering why a snowboarder would want to deal with Alta's countless flat and/or uphill traverses. Overall, it seemed not many care either way. 

      As BroMontana put it:

      "Alta excludes 40% of the wider skiing population in order to provide an experience that's 10% better for the remaining 60% of the population. For skiers, it's great. For the overall population, it constitutes an irrational reduction in fun factor on public land. Labowski would not abide. It's basically jihad."

      Most Gripped Moment?

      Forum members recap some of the scariest moments of their lives, from jumping off the wrong cliff to being shot at to running from the cops to being caught in an avalanceh to being in a lighting storm while climbing the Grand Teton. 

      33 Days Across Wrangell St. Elias NP, AK: The Southern Spiral (NSR)

      wrangell-st-ealias-national-park-alaska_jim-harris-photo.jpg

      Photographer Jim Harris aka The Gharwhale has been finding his way into crazy adventures for years now, and his trip report from 2009, when he traversed 430 miles on foot and float around Alaska's Wrangell St. Elias National Park with three other friends, continues to inspire in 2014.

      Vermont Backcountry Skiing Development...

      Members set out debating the utility and wisdom of a proposal being pursued by folks in the town of Rochester, Vermont, that would establish the area as a backcountry skiing destination by encouraging guiding services and thinning of state and national forestland trees for better glade skiing. The organization is naturally called RASTA (Rochester Area Sports Trails Alliance), and members debated their proposal either by recognizing the need and desire for dedicated backcountry skiing areas and others who thought the idea of corraling the population into a specific backcountry area would just destroy whatever pow is there currently.

      Can We Start Some 2014-2015 Gear Rumors Yet?

      Gear whores of the world unite. 23 pages worth of photos, rumors, and details of next year's ski gear, covering everything from the new Atomic Bent Chetler to the Moment Underworld to the new Tecnica Cochise boot. Sure to boil over once all the photos from SIA are in the door...

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    • 3 months ago
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  • Jay Peak --- Deep November!! Jay Peak --- Deep November!!

    • From: jw1080
    • Description:

      Short vid of epic deep pow on the right coast.  For 3 days in early November, Jay Peak was the place to be to rip deep pow turns anywhere.

    • 5 months ago
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  • Big Jay back country Big Jay back country

    • From: jw1080
    • Description:

      GoPro POV shot of a line in the Big Jay bc in N. VT.  Good snow last year!!

    • 5 months ago
    • Views: 163
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  • Charlie Kauffman Season Edit Charlie Kauffman Season Edit

    • From: cjk11
    • Description:
      Rider: Charlie Kauffman Filmed By: Taylor Mikell, Tom Ashworth, Teo Calcagni, Barry Lyden and Charlie Kauffman This is a video of my season. I race for MMSC, but free skiing is my favorite part of the sport.
    • 11 months ago
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  • The Weak 14 By Ian Compton The Weak 14 By Ian Compton

    • From: TetonGravityResearch
    • Description:

      I am sorry I been away from my computer for so long. I made a pilgrimage North to Sugarbush VT where I met up with great friend Evan Williams. Fun times were had and laps were taken, thank you Sugarbush for providing us with such an amazing park. Since you all wanted more park skiing I thought a good ol' fashioned rap song would suffice. Enjoy and see you next Tuesday. - Ian

      Watch LINE Videos

       

    • 1 year ago
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  • News: Learn To Ski Month Offer News: Learn To Ski Month Offers Free Skiing in Vermont

    • From: TetonGravityResearch
    • Description:

       

      Ski Free in Vermont

      To kick off National Learn to Ski Month of January, The Woodstock Inn & Resort is celebrating with a Ski Free Program for resort guests throughout the ski season. Adults ski free Monday through Friday and kids ski free all week at the resort’s Suicide Six Ski Area, which features two chair lifts with a J-bar service to 23 trails, or at the Nordic Center with more than 30 kilometers of groomed cross country skiing. 

      The Ski Free Program includes:

      ·         Complimentary lift tickets to Suicide Six Family Ski Area

      ·        Free Pass to the Nordic Center offering more than 30 kilometers of groomed cross country skiing and snowshoeing

      ·        Complimentary use of The Resort's Racquet & Fitness Club including training equipment, indoor pool, steam room, sauna, and hot tub

      ·        Morning coffee and afternoon tea

      ·        Discounted equipment rentals at ski shops


      The Ski Free program is available to guests when booking any room rate or package. Suicide Six features 30 percent beginner, 40 percent intermediate and 30 percent advanced slope ratings and one of the most family-friendly ski areas in Vermont. The base Lodge features a ski school, ski shop, cafeteria, and lounge/restaurant – perfectly located with a full view of the Face and the lower ends of all the trails. Offer not available holiday weekends and holiday weeks.

      For twice the fun, skiers can also experience Killington, the largest ski area in the East, only twenty minutes from Woodstock Inn & Resort. A special Killington Express Package includes a Killington all-day ski pass for two, one night luxurious accommodations at The Resort and country breakfast for two along with all the benefits of the Ski Free Program. Rates start at $369 per night, not including tax, gratuity or resort fee. Some nights require a minimum length of stay.  For information and to make reservations, visit www.woodstockinn.com or call (888)-481-8802.

      Discover some of the most scenic cross country and snowshoeing trails anywhere at the Woodstock Inn Nordic Center. The Nordic Center features miles of trails surrounding the picturesque village of Woodstock, VT all mapped out for convenience. Highlights include the trails on Mt. Tom in the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park and woodland trails on Mt. Peg. The Center offers rental and retail ski and snowshoe equipment, clothing and both private and semi-private lessons.

      Throughout the winter season Woodstock Inn & Resort provides guests with a number of dining and recreational options to enhance their stay. The Red Rooster, the resort’s award-winning fine dining restaurant emphasizes a menu using fresh, local ingredients sourced from the best purveyors in New England.  Richardson’s Tavern offers a cozy old-world atmosphere with a full bar and live music.  Resort activities include a 41,000 square foot Racquet & Fitness Club, which includes indoor tennis courts, indoor racquetball courts, a 30-by-60 foot indoor lap pool, a whirlpool, workout equipment and a steam room and a sauna. The 10,000 square-foot LEED-certified spa offers a nature-inspired ambiance and treatments including the signature winter selection, Deep Forest, which features a gentle exfoliation of the body and is followed by a massage.

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    • 1 year ago
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  • The End Of The World - The Wea The End Of The World - The Weak 5 By Ian Compton

    • From: line_skis
    • Description:

      Will there ever be another Weak? I guess we find out on Friday...This Weak Andy&Ross picked Ian Compton up and headed to Nashoba Valley,MA for “The Tell a friend Tour”. There we met up with fellow comrades such as Collin, Joe Joe and Ryan Dunfee. After turns were made both on snow and grass we entered the Van once again and set sail North to Sugarbush, VT and to say hello&EatPizza at the wonder Ski Rack. Big shout out to Ian Corredera and his 50/50 game. Hope you all had a good Weak, See you next Tuesday.

      Watch More Videos By Line Skis

       

    • 1 year ago
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  • News: Jake Burton Creates His News: Jake Burton Creates His First Signature Snowboard - The Stone Hut

    • From: TetonGravityResearch
    • Description:

      Jake Burton builds The Stone Hut
      BURLINGTON, VT - For the first time, Jake Burton, Founder and CEO of Burton Snowboards, has built a very limited run of signature snowboards called ‘The Stone Hut’. Available in select snowboard shops worldwide starting today, each Stone Hut snowboard was handcrafted in Vermont at Craig’s (named after Craig Kelly), the most advanced snowboard prototype facility in the world.

      “Even though a piece of me has been in so many of our boards over the past 35 years, this is the first signature board I’ve built,” said Jake. “When the boards team approached me about doing a sig board, I jumped on it and talked them into doing a really limited production run so we could make them in Vermont at Craig’s. Up until now, we’ve only made prototypes or boards for team riders there. So the Stone Hut is special for many reasons, but the one I keep coming back to is I think Craig would be stoked that it was built in his facility - I know I am.”

      The Stone Hut snowboard
      During this past summer, Jake spent a lot of time at Craig’s, fine-tuning each detail of the Stone Hut. His goal was to create a snowboard that was ideal for ‘a powder day in the park’ – essentially a board that was very versatile so riders could easily head down an icy groomer, then dip into powder in the trees. As far as construction goes, the concept behind the Stone Hut board is simple. It’s a twin shaped freestyle board underfoot with a powder nose and a freestyle tail. The Bend is Flat Top, so it holds an edge when riders need it, but also floats in powder. Available in two lengths (150 and 155), the Stone Hut is downsized so that riders can select a board length that is 5 cms shorter than a traditional board.

      For Jake, the Stone Hut board graphic is also ‘a dream come true’ because it features someone he’s always looked up to - Jimi Hendrix. With artwork from the Jimi Hendrix album, Valleys of Neptune, the board graphics are one-of-a-kind. For a finishing touch, Jake personally signed each board at Craig’s.

      Riding the Stone Hut
      The Stone Hut also comes with a few items Jake thought would go well with the board, all packaged in a laptop case that features artwork from Valleys of Neptune. The kit includes EST CantBEDs (size medium), a binding accessory that many Burton team riders and Jake use all the time. If riders need a different size, they can call Jake’s office directly – the number is listed with the kit. Also included is a Sharpie for marking binding stances, an EST Tool for fine-tuning bindings, a credit card scraper that fits in a wallet, a code to download some of Jake’s favorite Hendrix songs and stickers from the Burton archives.

      With only 100 available worldwide, the Stone Hut promises to be a collector’s item for sure. But more than anything else, Jake wants riders to get the boards on snow and send him feedback about the new shape.

      “I want people to have fun riding this board, and I want to hear what they think of the unique shape,” said Jake. “I also hope everyone gets a good laugh from the stickers that come with the board - I couldn’t resist throwing in some that got us in a little trouble over the years.”

      Jake Burton in Craig's
      About Burton

      In 1977, Jake Burton Carpenter founded Burton Snowboards out of his Vermont barn and has dedicated his life to snowboarding ever since. Burton has played a pivotal role in growing snowboarding from a backyard hobby to a world-class sport by creating groundbreaking products, supporting a team of top snowboarders and pushing resorts to allow snowboarding. Today, Burton designs and manufactures industry-leading products for snowboarding and the snowboard lifestyle, including snowboards, boots, bindings, outerwear and layering as well as year-round apparel, packs/bags and accessories. Privately held and owned by Jake and his wife, Burton President Donna Carpenter, Burton’s headquarters are in Burlington, Vermont with offices in Austria, Japan, Australia and California. For more information, visit www.burton.com.

      Shops That Carry The Stone Hut:

      U.S.

      Active Sports Lifestyles – California
      Surfside Sports – California
      Valsurf Board Shop – California
      Wave Rave of Mammoth – California
      B.C. Surf & Sport – Colorado
      Gravitee – Colorado
      Radio Boardshop – Colorado
      Shred Shop – Illinois
      Backwoods Snowboards – Maine
      Eastern Boarder – Massachusetts
      Wind, Waves & Wheels – Michigan
      Paragon Sporting Goods – New York
      Martini Skate and Snow – Ohio
      U.S. Outdoor Store – Oregon
      Buckman’s Ski Shop – Pennsylvania
      Vertical Urge – North Carolina
      Milosport – Orem, Utah
      Milosport – California
      Salty Peaks Snowboard Shop – Utah
      Darkside Snowboards – Vermont
      Equipe Sport/Mountain Riders – Vermont
      evo – Washington
      Snowboard Connection – Washington
      Moda 3 – Wisconsin

      CANADA

      Easy Rider – Alberta
      The Source – Alberta
      Unlimited – Alberta
      Pacific Boarder – British Columbia
      Island Snow – British Columbia
      Showcase Whistler – British Columbia
      Fathom – Ontario
      Meltdown – Ontario
      So Hip it Hurts – Ontario
      Alternative – Quebec
      Atlas – Quebec
      Burton Tremblant – Quebec
      Empire – Quebec

      EUROPE

      Blue Tomato – Austria
      Twits – Belgium
      Addicted Lyon – France
      Francois Cogne Surf Shop – France
      Fifty-Eight Skate Snow Surf – Germany
      Planet Sports – Germany
      Detour Boarding Store- Italy
      Surf In – Luxembourg
      The Old Man – Netherlands
      Kosmos Burton Skate Snowshop- Poland
      Dak Tak 2000 – Spain
      Villadomat – Andorra
      Junkyard – Sweden
      Julen Sport – Switzerland
      Subvert Boardstore– United Kingdom

      JAPAN

      Spray- Asahikawa
      Dreamy- Himeji
      Post- Koriyama
      3939- Nagoya
      Masa- Nagoya
      Chu’s – Nigata
      Greenfield- Okazaki
      b.c. map- Sapporo
      Extreme- Sendai
      Heaven Store.b – Tokorozawa
      13 a-bony – Yokkaichi
      Newest- Yokohama
      Neverland- Zyoetsu

      Jake Burton at work

    • Blog post
    • 2 years ago
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  • Skiing Hurricane Sandy: 24 Hou Skiing Hurricane Sandy: 24 Hours Of Appalachian Powder

    • From: TetonGravityResearch
    • Description:

      On the Skin Up in WV

      By Andrew Orowitz and Dalton Harben

      Photos by Dalton Harben

      It’s no secret that the mid-Atlantic region is home to some of the highest elevation peaks east of the Mississippi.  But as backcountry skiers based in the Northern Greens, the thought of skiing south of the Mason-Dixon line had never really been a high priority. That all changed when Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc on the eastern seaboard – and set up the high plateaus of West Virginia with some of the best early-season powder conditions in the country.

      The monster hurricane-Nor’easter hybrid was still ravaging the New York and New Jersey coastline when seasoned storm chaser and owner of Worth Skis, Dalton Harben, called me to explain why it was crucial that we get in his truck and drive south to ski 3-plus feet of snow in Canaan Valley, West Virginia, immediately. He sent over photos of buried cars and untracked tree lines to back up his powdery claims. The wintery images became etched in my mind. Dalton also mentioned something about product testing for Worth and the overwhelming desire to ski powder. That it was some sort of sickness. I laughed it off.

      Skiing Hurricane Sandy in West Virginia
      Even if it was 45 degrees and raining in Vermont, it was completely ridiculous to even consider driving 24 hours for 24 hours of human-powered storm of skiing in the mid-Atlantic Appalachians. Or was it?

      Almost instinctively, negotiations were made with loved ones, personal days were requested of bosses, and skins, long underwear and goggles made their way into backpacks. Our unlikely Snovember adventure was actually coming together. At around 9 p.m., we began our 12-hour journey through the Halloween night to ski hillbilly powder upon arrival in the morning. What had started as a joke the day before had suddenly become very real. With the Tundra fully-loaded, we hightailed it out of VT and down the New York Thruway to meet our friend and fellow storm chaser, Matt Cote, at the Kingston, New York Park & Ride.

      Dropping in to Hurricane Sandy
      Reports of icy roads, widespread power outages and gas shortages continued to stream in from the Canaan Valley. But as far as we were concerned, it was ski season, we were storm chasing and all was right in the world. Buoyed by yet another cup of coffee, the morning light and the thought of skiing powder after the endless off-season, Matt C. took over the driving near the West Virginia border and the truck began it’s steady ascent to an elevation of around 3,000 feet.

      Skiing Hurricane Sandy
      Arriving at the Cannan Valley Resort bleary-eyed and nearly delirious, we were greeted by an officer who took one look at us and said, “I hate snow. Hate it.” Moving right along, we signed up for $10/night rooms that included breakfast, lunch and dinner, but no heat. Seemed fair.

      Skiing powder in Hurricane Sandy

      We hurried along to our first objective: the White Grass Touring Center, just a few miles down the road from our accommodations. Right away, Chip, the ski area’s beloved and bearded manager, invited us into the rustic base lodge to warm up by the woodstove and get ready for the ski. From the “donations only today” note on the ticket booth window, to the dogs and kids running around, to the timeless feel of the well-worn hut, it was clear that what White Grass lacked in vertical, it completely made up for with a pure, unadulterated love of skiing.

      Skiing in WV during Hurricane Sandy

      Maintaining a unique yet familiar mountain vibe, White Grass attracts a certain type of BC skier, one that longs for the serenity of an untracked glade and the company of a few close friends. After just a few minutes in the lodge, White Grass had already left an impression on us.  A former Vermont resident himself, Chipper (as he is affectionately known,) explained that to him, the Canaan Valley represents “Vermont South.” Sharing a love of mountains, a laid-back lifestyle and a passion for skiing, it’s easy to see why. He was eager to get out on the local terrain and the fresh snow, and after all night driving in the truck, we were all more than ready to finally get out on the skin track. After a few quick laps, our group of nearly a dozen broke off into smaller groups and began exploring the various tree lines, backcountry huts and open meadows.

      Crushing pow in WV
      Deprived of sleep and with a few thousand feet of vertical under our belts, one way or another, we all made it back to the White Grass base area. While the region was still without power, we warmed ourselves from the inside with a jar of moonshine that was making the rounds. Before long we got word from Chip that we had been “evacuated” from our hotel. Luck had been on our side up to this point, and I wondered to myself whether the three of us would be sleeping in the back of the Tundra instead of our well-appointed hotel room. When we arrived back at the front desk we were informed that due to the heavy moisture content of the snow, they were concerned the hotel roof could collapse. Fortunately, they moved our group to a 4-bedroom cabin complete with a fireplace (for the same $10 a night fee.) I guess this is what they mean by southern hospitality.

      Our upgraded accomodations

      After stoking up the fire to try to warm up our cabin, we were treated to an all-you-could eat dinner of pork loin, roasted potatoes, chicken soup, salad, rolls and cake back at the hotel. Sitting around in the dark with a bunch of friends, skiers who were a long way from home, we shared stories and made a plan for the next day of skiing before heading back to the cabin to for an early night.

      Skiing Hurricane Sandy in West Virginia

      First thing in the morning, we grabbed a quick breakfast back at the hotel before heading over to check out another ski area just down the road called Timberline. The clouds and snow of the day before had lifted and we could finally get a feel for the lay of the land. Right away we could see that Timberline had a better pitch and more vertical than White Grass. Right away, Jon S. who was visiting from Massachusetts, set a very efficient skin track up to the Summit. After a few laps, Dalton, Matt and I knew our Snovember West Virginia ski adventure was coming to end. We had a 12-hour drive ahead of us. The skiing, snow quality and location had far exceeded our expectations – but more than anything, we were comforted by the familiar feeling of sliding around on snow, with good friends (both new and old), and knowing that Winter was just beginning. The ride home was exactly what you would expect. Long, dark and at times painful. We’re used to it. We made it back home to Vermont around midnight to find that snowing was once again falling in the Green Mountains. Thinking back, it would have been easier to exercise a little patience and to wait for the snow to come to us, but where’s the adventure in that? We all agreed we would do it again in a heartbeat.

      Skiing the woods of WV in Hurricane Sandy
      Click Here For More Photos From This Trip

      Click Here For More On Worth Skis

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    • 2 years ago
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  • News: Burton Realigns Its Fami News: Burton Realigns Its Family Of Brands

    • From: TetonGravityResearch
    • Description:

      Jake Burton

      BURLINGTON, VT - Burton Snowboards announced that its senior management team has elected to alter the structure of Burton owned brands to better position the company, its retail partners and stakeholders for the future. The current family of brands includes Analog, Gravis, RED, anon, Foursquare, Forum, Special Blend and Channel Islands. During a company-wide meeting at its headquarters in Vermont, Burton Founder and CEO Jake Burton explained the new structure and how it will allow Burton to focus on what it does best: make and support products that set the bar for snowboarding development and further progress the sport and lifestyle.

      Specifically, Burton announced the following changes to its structure and subsidiaries. Over the next year, Analog will return to its roots of being a pure snowboarding brand based at its original home in Burlington, Vermont. Analog has a deep heritage in snowboarding from the day when Greg Dacyshyn (Burton Chief Creative Officer) and the late Jeffy Anderson (Team Rider) gave birth to the brand in Burlington, and as such, will revert back to being a winter-only brand. Burton’s Gravis brand will ultimately move its headquarters to Tokyo, Japan and moving forward will be solely distributed in Asian markets selling lifestyle shoes and bags. Gravis was established in 1998 as the company’s first independent lifestyle brand, and since then, Asia has been by far its most successful region. As a result, Gravis will now focus purely on this market and opportunity. Further, in a move that Burton has been planning for several years, the company will also start developing protective headwear under the anon brand name. Burton will continue to offer its RED helmets on a limited basis, but the bulk of helmet and optics product lines will be combined under the anon brand, which has become synonymous with quality riding accessories.

      Also part of the restructure, Burton announced it will transition out of its Program brands (Foursquare, Forum and Special Blend), which were purchased in 2004 with the intent to keep snowboard companies in the hands of snowboarders. Burton has supported these brands for eight years and will continue to support them over the next year through warranty service, dealer support, marketing and inventory. The company will exit out of The Program brands in winter 2014, in order to better focus on and invest in Burton.

      Finally, Channel Islands, which was acquired by Burton in 2006, will be unaffected by this brand realignment and will continue to design, develop and manufacture best-in-class surf hardgoods products in Carpinteria, California.

      In addressing all of these changes, Jake Burton had this to say:

      “Burton has experienced several years of income growth since the recession and paid out bonuses to employees over the last two years,” said Jake. “That said, the economy has a voice of its own that we all have to listen to, and the message is clear: do what you do best and focus purely on it. In our case, that means to narrow our focus to the sport and lifestyle that got us here – snowboarding. We will continue to support Channel Islands in its endeavor to make the best surfboards in the world and Gravis in its new home in Japan, but when you walk through the front door here in Burlington, Vermont, it will be all snowboarding and snowboarding lifestyle all the time – driven by the Burton, Analog and anon brands.”

      Jake went on to share that one of the key factors that led senior management to these decisions includes the success of Burton’s entry into the apparel and bag/pack business on a year-round basis, which has grown significantly in all seasons. The message Burton has taken from the marketplace is that for long-term success, this is the direction that the company should be pursuing, along with its core hardgoods and outerwear business.

      Increasing the company’s focus on Burton has also been demonstrated by recent significant investments in Burton’s headquarters and infrastructure. These include the acquisition of the building next door to its Burlington, Vermont headquarters where the company not only built Craig’s, a new 10,000-square-foot R&D and prototype facility, but also Area 13, a 6,000-square-foot Burton/anon/Analog wholesale showroom. Craig’s (named after the late Craig Kelly) is known as the most advanced and sophisticated snowboard prototype facility in the world where ideas are conceived, built and on-snow in less than 24 hours. Area 13 is Burton’s marquee showroom where retailers from all over the world can come to Vermont to see future product lines. Like today’s announcement, both of these examples demonstrate the company’s commitment to the long-term growth, progression and success of the Burton snowboard brands.

      In closing, Jake went on to state the following:

      “I take full responsibility for the decisions that led to the creation (or acquisitions) of these ancillary brands, and I similarly am the individual ultimately responsible for the decision to realign and focus more purely on what made this company from the start. Clearly, the most difficult aspect of this decision and transition is the people affected. The employees and team riders associated with these brands have poured their guts into making it happen. Their level of commitment has been extraordinary, and we will do everything we can to help support them through this transition. There is never a good time for moves like this, and we could have delayed the announcement, but it isn’t our style to perpetuate a myth. Clearly this transition will pose challenges along the way, but in the long run, everyone will see the results of our commitment to our core business.”

       2012 Burton Restructure: Key Facts by Brand

      ANALOG

      Heritage

      Following Burton’s outerwear legacy, Analog was created in 1999 as a more progressive, style-conscious outerwear collection led by a handful of top pros at the time, including Trevor Andrew, Jeffy Anderson and Gigi Ruf. Since then, Analog has continued to drive many of snowboarding’s outerwear style trends, and in 2003 Analog added a streetwear component to its line, followed by surf apparel, a surf team and an Analog skate platform.

      Key Facts

      • Burton has made the decision to ultimately transition out of Analog surf and skate apparel by next fall.

      • Analog surf and skate apparel will be shipped through Spring/Summer ‘13, and will be marketed and supported.

      • After the spring season, Burton will continue to design, develop and distribute Analog as a winter-only brand, operating out of Burton’s headquarters in Burlington, Vermont, with points of distribution around the world.

      • The new Analog will only design and distribute Analog outerwear and tech apparel, called “ATF”, along with basics.

      Team Update

      The Analog snow team, made up of Danny Davis, Mikkel Bang and Zak Hale will continue on as Analog riders. Regarding the Analog surf and skate teams, we will be working with each team rider individually on an exit plan to transition them out of the brand.

      GRAVIS

      Heritage

      Gravis was started by Burton in 1998, as the company’s first independent lifestyle brand. From the start, Gravis was focused on creating casual footwear, bags and softgoods built on an action sports lifestyle platform. Today the brand is still rooted in footwear, with the addition of a skate shoe collection and team, launched in August, 2008.

      Key Facts

      • Gravis will ultimately become an Asian-only brand, which will result in the wind down of the brand in North America, Southern Hemisphere and Europe.

      • With this decision, Gravis’ headquarters will be re-located to Tokyo and run out of Japan, in order to best serve the Asian market where Gravis is the most established and where it has its most viable business.

      • Gravis product will be shipped through Spring/Summer ’13 in all regions. Gravis will become an Asian-only brand in the fall of 2013.

      Team Update

      With this move to be a primarily lifestyle brand, the Gravis team will be restructured to accommodate the lifestyle market in Asia.

      RED & ANON

      Heritage

      RED was started by Burton in 1996 as its first protection brand. Since then, RED has designed, developed and manufactured helmets and protective wear for pros and consumers alike. Anon was established as Burton’s eyewear brand in 2001 and focuses on goggles.

      Key Facts

      • Burton will be developing and manufacturing protective headwear (helmets) under the anon name. Anon has become synonymous with quality riding accessories, and it is a natural extension to add helmets to its mix.

      • RED helmets will continue to be sold on a limited basis. Anon helmets will be launched for Winter 2014 for all channels.

      Team Update

      We will be working with each RED and anon team rider on an individual basis regarding this announcement.

      THE PROGRAM (Foursquare, Forum, Special Blend)

      Heritage

      Burton purchased The Program brands in 2004 from Four Star Distribution. At that time, Burton felt an obligation (and an opportunity) to slow the trend of ski companies buying up snowboard brands. Consequently, when these companies went up for sale, Burton purchased them and they became ‘The Program’ brands for Burton.

      Key Facts

      • The intent from the beginning was to keep snowboard companies in the hands of snowboarders and keep these brands thriving. As the world’s leading snowboard company, Burton felt there would never be a better home for these three brands.

      • But even under Burton’s wing, after 8 years, the businesses have failed to be viable. Consequently, Burton has realized it’s time to exit out of them, in order to better focus and invest in the Burton brand.

      • Therefore, Burton will be transitioning out of Foursquare, Forum and Special Blend globally after this season.

      • Current winter 2013 product will be supported over the next year, via warranty, dealer, marketing and inventory support

      Team Update

      We will be working with each team rider on an individual exit plan to transition them out of these brands.

      CHANNEL ISLANDS

      Heritage

      Burton acquired Channel Islands Surfboards in June, 2006 after the founders of each company, Al Merrick and Jake Burton, forged an agreement over the fact they shared a similar mindset and passion for their respective sports. With their shared vision for putting the sports in the hands of the team athletes and shared philosophies on hardgoods product development, it was a very natural partnership.

      Key Facts

      • Channel Islands is not affected by the announcements today. Burton will continue to support the CI operation in Carpinteria, California, as usual.

      • Burton is very happy with and committed to our relationship with Channel Islands.

      Team Update

      There will be no team riders affected, as there are no changes to the Channel Islands operating or marketing structure.

      BURTON SNOWBOARDS

      Burton will continue to do what it does best: make and support products that set the bar for snowboarding development. The most graphic change will be increased resources and investments made available to Burton to further progress our sport and lifestyle. Outside of our renewed focus, it will be business as usual.

    • Blog post
    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 174
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  • The Weaklings. (MiniMovie)by.I The Weaklings. (MiniMovie)by.Ian Compton

    • From: TetonGravityResearch
    • Description:

      Welp the East Coast got dealt a shitty hand this winter. Through out the Weak's friends assembled to explore VT a little more. This is what came of it. Enjoy the mini movie mes amis, hope next year brings more snow...

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 10
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